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Copyright 2014 - Essense Massage & Bodywork

DISCLAIMER:  The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

What You Should Know


Certification in Pre- and Perinatal Massage Therapy


It is important to seek care from a certified prenatal massage therapist. Certified therapists have received training beyond the national standards for massage therapists and know how to address specific pregnancy needs and sensitive areas of the body.


I have just taken a course that certifies me to work as a massage therapist for pregnant, as well as labor and delivery clients. I really enjoy working with mommies to be, and I continue to learn through continuing education classes and workshops.



Body Positioning During the Massage


The positioning for massage varies with which trimester the woman is in. Generally speaking, in the first trimester the woman can lie as she normally would when she's not pregnant.  In the second and third trimesters, the massage will be given side-lying and semi-reclining.  The side-lying position stabilizes while soothingly cradling in all the right places - breasts, shoulders, necks, bellies, and hips by using specifically shaped support cushions. uses lots of pillows and most women find it very comfortable. Another safe position for prenatal massage is semi-reclining.  This position is achieved by leaning back at about a 45-70 degree angle.  Read more about positioning and safety.  


Beginning week 14 laying face down (prone) is not recommended, even with specialized equipment such as “cut-out” tables or cushions.  It is believed that strain to the sacrouterine ligament is likely when lying second and third trimester women prone on the table.  This ligament holds the uterus to the spine.  The uterus is housing the developing fetus and keeping it safe.  It is best not to take any chances with disrupting the uterus and the ligaments that hold it in place.  If the strain of gravity during a prone position is a concern then additional strain placed on the ligament when the massage therapist begins to massage the women’s back is of greater concern.  The additional weight and pressure applied to the back during prone procedures may significantly increase intrauterine pressure. Again, no undue strain to the developing fetus is wanted or necessary.     


More About Body Positioning

Copyright 2014 - Essense Massage & Bodywork

DISCLAIMER:  The contents of this site are for informational purposes only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.  Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.